Contributors

  • Helen Alvaré
  • Ryan T. Anderson
  • Ursula Cristina Basset
  • Paola Bernardini
  • Emanuele Bilotti
  • Mark Bonner
  • Teresa Collette
  • Robert Fastiggi
  • Carmen Domínguez Hidalgo
  • Maria Hildingsson
  • John Klink
  • Gudrun Kugler
  • Marguerite Peters
  • Grégor Puppnick
  • Elizabeth Schiltz
  • Marie Smith
  • Aleksander Stępkowski
  • Vincenzo Vitale

Welcome to ICOLF

The Future of the Family: The Social and Legal Impacts of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage

The article makes clear that the argument of those favoring “same sex marriage” that such homosexual relationships further the common good just as much and contribute to the good of society just as much as heterosexual man-woman marriages falls short. There are various state interests in heterosexual man-woman marriage that are altogether lacking in intimate […]

Beyond the Expansion Framework: How Same Sex Marriage Changes the Institutional Meaning of Marriage and Heterosexual Men’s Conception of Marriage

This article critically argues that “same sex marriage” does not expand the benefits of traditional marriage to everyone; rather, it fundamentally changes the meaning of marriage by making gender (sex) optional. In so doing, the already tenuous connection between sexuality, marriage, and procreation is further weakened. In particular, the argument is made that marriage always served as […]

Pope John Paul II and Religious Liberty

This article explores the thought of Pope John Paul II on religious liberty. Reference is made to the significance of Dignitatis Humanae as the interpretive key to Vatican II. The article does a fine job of contextualizing religious freedom within a broader context. In particular, the central question explored is whether a state may under certain […]

An Introduction to the Canonical Achievements of Pope John Paul II

His Holiness Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyła, reigned 1978 to 2005) was not a jurist-pope in the tradition of, for example, Pope Gregory IX, who directed St. Raymond of Peñafort in the production of the Liber Extra, also called Decretales.  St. Raymond’s work served as a cornerstone of canon law until the twentieth century. […]

Catholic Contributions and Critiques of Human Rights Law within European Institutions

This article examines European institutions and their developing policies from a Catholic perspective. It explores how different EU institutions work and are justified as “democratic.”  In particular, the article focuses on a dangerous development within EU institutions towards gender ideology, an essentially Marxist ideology. It also discusses non-negotiable principles that Catholic are bound in conscience to uphold, and how […]

An Introduction to the Canonical Achievements of Pope John Paul II

His Holiness Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyła, reigned 1978 to 2005) was not a jurist-pope in the tradition of, for example, Pope Gregory IX, who directed St. Raymond of Peñafort in the production of the Liber Extra, also called Decretales (1).  St. Raymond’s work served as a cornerstone of canon law until the twentieth […]

The San Jose Articles and an International Right to Abortion

Abortion advocates are on a mission to establish an “international” right to abortion using “soft norms” under customary international law.  Their ultimate goal is to weave throughout the various sources of customary international law, language implying an international consensus that abortion is a necessary component of fundamental health that must be provided by States to […]

Reconciling Surrogacy Adversaries Through the Embryo

by Katarina Lee • Surrogacy is constantly in the news, with the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell,[1] the recent conviction of an owner of an American surrogacy company,[2] and the recent birth of Lucy Liu’s son via a gestational surrogate.[3] Like many bioethical issues, surrogacy divides individuals into three distinct groups: (A) those who believe surrogacy […]

Catholics and Civil Engagement

Although developed in the context of thirteenth-century Italy, Aquinas’s theory of law might be considered very modern.  For Aquinas, the function of civil law was not to prescribe everything that is morally right and to forbid everything that is morally wrong (1).  At the same time, Aquinas did not affirm that law and morality have absolutely […]

UNESCO’S PROGRAM FOR SEXUALITY EDUCATION IN LIGHT OF A PROPER UNDERSTANDING OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

Over the past few years, several international organizations have advocated a need for sexuality education. From June to December 2009, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization [hereinafter UNESCO] published International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education: An Evidence Informed Approach for Schools, Teachers, and Health Educators, and International Guidelines on Sexuality Education: an evidence informed approach […]